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20121027
20121104
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definitely be smiling. we're seeing a continued deterioration of the small business economy. we're seeing month-over-month hiring continue to fall. we're seeing the average paycheck continue to fall. where we are seeing growth is in temporary or contract workers. > > let's backfill some of the numbers. hiring: what happened there? > > hiring we saw it fall 0.1% month-over-month, and it's clearly down for the year. > > you call it the pay index, but that's essentially what small businesspeople are paying their employees. what happened there? > > the average paycheck fell 0.2%. so, the take-home pay was hurt in the month of october. > > and you had, the last time you were here, there was a trend it seemed like with more and more contractor use. is that continuing? > > it is a continued trend, and we're seeing more and more contractors on the payroll as one of the sort of relief valves given all the uncertainty about the future of the economy. > > so that means that instead of hiring more, they want to have the contractors in as sort of a buffer, because they don't know where things are goin
. > > better-than-expected news about the economy came out in that gdp number on friday. will we see follow-through in the market today? > > i think you will see a little bit of follow-through. that number is really a feel- good number. 2% above expectations. but really i do think it's important to dig down into the details of that number - fixed investment and exports actually contracting. so, the question is how long can the consumer continue to spend and the government continue to spend and prop up the economy? so, i think that's something you have to watch. but yes, i do think we'll see a little follow-through today. > > how much of an effect do you think this storm that seems to be brewing out there, wicked whether this week, will affect the market? will it be rattled? > > the models say that this storm could be a really big storm, going back to predate some of the other historic ones. i think you could see a little lower volume if it really does have an impact on the financial markets, which could make for a little bit more volatility. but really i think you have to look at the commod
the east coast. in our cover story how sandy is shutting down everything including parts of the economy. but will the effects be lasting ones? sandy's frightful combination of late-season hurricane colliding with an artic storm led to mass evacuations in the northeast. "if you are in an evacuation zone and haven't left, get out now before you can't." atlantic city casinos-- silent. rockaway, new york--braced with bulldozed walls of sand. an expected storm surge during a full-moon, when tides are at their highest already could reach 11-feet. in midtown manhattan, high winds broke a construction crane atop a high- rise. "...of the 76 evacuation shelters located in public schools around the city, there are already more than 90-people here." at airports from washington to boston--a region of 50-million people, airlines canceled more than 13,700 flights through wednesday-- although some operations may resume tuesday afternoon. but for the first time since 18-88, the new york stock exchange will have been closed for two consecutive days due to weather, monday and tuesday. it intends to reopen
with the economy. what happens though when disaster strikes? > > you know, the airlines are pretty well prepared. some of the percentages i heard is that when there are cancellations to this magnitude, the rebooking rates they like to see in the 80% rate. and i heard that the rebooking rates for all of these missed flights are going to be somewhere in the 75% to 80% area. i wouldn't doubt if we see airlines just sell off a touch. i don't think we're going to see anything really massive. we will probably see some hurt to the bottom line in the fourth quarter, but you know what, that might be offset by lower energy prices, lower oil prices, which they're going to have to pay going forward. > > what do you think about the utility stocks? are those likely to move, especially on the east coast? > > you know, they probably will, but the biggie that everyone's going to really watch in the commodities space is the oil market. it's kind of the chicken and the egg here. demand is going to be down, but, from everything that's been reported out there, the supply is down, but demand is going to be way, way d
't really find true answers yet. > > but at least the economy is still clicking. good to have you on the show this morning, todd. take care. > > thank you so much. have a great day. some airlines have resumed limited service to some of new york's airports, but some have not, and it's leaving some passengers, especially business travelers, up in the air. in our cover story, the reasons your meetings may be cancelled are underwater at the end of a runway. airlines hope to resume flights to new york's laguardia airport thursday afternoon. limited service returned to jfk and newark wednesday. "the first thing i'd tell a business traveller is call a travel agent who can get you through some of the ins and outs during this time. one of the challenges is the repositioning of jets to ny. they have to bring them back in." american airlines extended its rebooking period on storm- affected tickets without penalty through december 20th instead of the usual one-week or refunds if a flight was cancelled. but customers on united have only until november 9th to reschedule. new york's subway syste
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5